Review: Left Edge Theater’s ‘Race,’ the latest social provocation from David Mamet

“You want to tell me about black people?” In director Carl Jordan’s sensitive, doggedly humane staging of David Mamet’s 2009 drama Race – running through March 26 at Left Edge Theater – that confrontational line comes early, as a brilliant black lawyer, Henry (Dorian Lockett, funny, furious, and absolutely superb) faces off against a potential client, the cocky…

Transcendence Theater takes Broadway – and a taste of Jack London Park – to Marin County

Every summer, since 2012, the Transcendence Theatre Company takes over the gorgeous, open-air winery ruins at Glen Ellen’s Jack London State Historic Park, for a months-long series of shows succinctly and appropriately called ‘Broadway Under the Stars.’ Generally, the show features Broadway tunes (and others), performed by an energetic troupe of Broadway performers, staging effervescently…

‘The Canon’: In which I describe my mission to see every one of Shakespeare’s plays – and meet some folks who tell me why that’s not possible

It is generally accepted that William Shakespeare—aka the Immortal Bard, aka the Upstart Crow, aka the Sweet Swan of Avon, aka the greatest playwright the world has ever known—wrote 37 plays during his lifetime, which ended exactly 400 years ago last April 23. He possibly wrote more. Possibly a lot more. Possibly even a play…

Patrick Ball’s new solo show – a look at Irish poet W.B. Yeats – plays this weekend at Cinnabar Theater

“William Butler Yeats was an astonishingly complex individual,” says harpist and storyteller Patrick Ball, describing the legendary Irish poet and playwright — and sometime politician and mystic philosopher — whose mysterious, atmospheric poetry has solidly placed its creator within the ranks of the greatest literary figures of the 20th Century. “He was brilliant of course,…

Sonoma’s Sebastiani Theater to screen ‘Waking Ned Devine’ in honor of St. Patrick’s Day – and because it’s still a great movie!

For years now, a number of notable cable television stations and movie revival houses have marked St. Patrick’s Day by playing the John Wayne-Maureen O’Hara classic “The Quiet Man,” among other shamrock-flavored films. It makes sense. The 65-year-old film does still hold up, dramatically – for its charming small town setting and magnificent fist-fight-brawl at…